PUT HUMANITY BACK IN HUMAN NATURE

I suppose it’s human nature to be wary of an individual who has offended, injured, disrespected, or committed a crime against us. It is natural to be reluctant to allow that person to ever get close to us again or to enjoy a position of trust.
But is it right to distrust an entire race, religion, occupational group, or political body because of the actions of a few? That kind of thinking got Japanese-Americans imprisoned during WWII. They looked like the enemy, so they were treated like the enemy and locked up—just in case.
There is a theory making the rounds these days that, since a group of terrorists using Islam as its umbrella organization is forcing a malignant version of Islam on the world, then all followers of Islam must also be bad and all Muslims should be booted out of America and no more allowed in.
There were good Germans during World War II who fought against the Nazis and supported the Jews that were so hated by Adolph Hitler and his evil band of followers. There are Muslims who resent that their religion has been hijacked by a band of thugs that believes that those who do not think as they do should be killed.
As difficult as it might be to believe, there are more good members than bad ones in our gridlocked Congress. Crooked, self-serving politicians are in the minority. The other kind are in the news, hungry for your attention and their aspirations for re-election and higher office.
There are a lot of good cops out there, working to make their cities and towns safe. It is wrong to target all police because of a few rogues.
Let’s not punish the honorable and the innocent while punishing the guilty.
Let’s not treat everyone like the worst one

BULLYING BEHAVIOR MUST BE CHANGED EARLY

Babies see themselves as the center of the universe. They expect to be indulged. For the most part, they are. Left to their own devices children can be selfish and demanding. Taken to the extreme they can try to dominate others physically and psychologically. As they grow out of their babyhood they are expected to learn consideration for others. Unless that behavior is interrupted in the formative years antisocial behavior will become more pronounced as they grow to adolescence and adulthood. It’s up to the parents to show the child that, while a certain degree of assertiveness is acceptable as a way of making their way in the world, the instinct must be moderated in the very young before it can turn into unacceptable behavior beyond adolescence; spousal abuse, criminal assault, sexual assault, workplace aggression, etc.

https://www.amazon.com/All-That-Time-Steve-Liddick/dp/0971419345/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1470331979&sr=8-1&keywords=steve+liddick

 

BULLYING DOES NOT STOP AT CHILDHOOD

We hear a lot about young people whose lives have been dramatically affected by bullying. Some have even ended their lives because the pressure was too much to bear. Those who survive to adulthood often carry with them wounds that have never healed. Being made to feel worthless or unacceptable as a child can impact the adult years, as well. Damaged self-esteem can affect future personal relationships, professional success, lifetime earnings. There are bullies in the adult world, as well; the domineering boss, the back-stabbing fellow employee, the abusive spouse. Those who were abused when they were young may not have the confidence to resist the adult bully. The psychological effects of bullying can be even more damaging than physical abuse in the long term.

My new novel, All That Time is about Ted McBride, a man whose life has been damaged by the bullies of his childhood, up through adolescence . . . and how it took a trip back in time to combat his demons. All About Time is now available in paperback at bookstores and on-line booksellers and as a digital download through all the major Internet eBook distributors.

novel, fiction, time travel, fantasy

PACKING FOR THE APOCALYPSE

You don’t have to be an extreme survivalist or end-of-the-world freak to realize that emergencies could come up that would require that you evacuate your home, even for a brief period. If that ever becomes necessary, you want to have what is called a “Go Bag,” a bag containing everything you will need to survive until conditions return to normal; a bag you can grab as you fly out the door. Here is a suggested list of items you would need: http://www.survivalistreviews.com/go-bag-contents/. My camping cookbook would also be useful, in addition to being a friendly read: http://www.amazon.com/Campsite-Gourmet-Fine-Dining-Trail/dp/0971419302/ref=tmm_other_meta_binding_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1406899068&sr=1-3