STILL A FARM BOY

REFLECTIONS

by Steve Liddick

Most people who live in California come from somewhere else. That includes me. It is an automatic assumption that you are not from here.

It’s not like that where I actually do come from. I think most people who live in Perry County, Pennsylvania started out there and are still there—or not far away. I seem to be the exception.

Careers sometimes send you to places you would not have chosen on your own. The weather is often a factor that drives people south. Itchy feet is a common cause among the young.

When people ask me where I’m from, even though I have lived in a lot of places and been all over the world, it’s an easy answer; I claim a little green hunk of paradise among rolling Pennsylvania hills and sparkling streams. It has a rich history that goes back well before we were the United States of America—and has a population that appreciates it.

I’m sure many who still live there don’t see my ancestral home as I do. The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. I looked over that fence in 1958 and set off for what I thought were greener pastures. In fact, it turned out to be many years of bumpy roads and stormy skies. It is true that times would not always have been ideal if I had stayed closer to my roots, but in all the other places I’ve lived, I never felt truly connected. If you are going to have troubles anyway, it is more comforting to suffer them among those you grew up with. They forgive you your shortcomings because they were standing right next to you when you acquired them.

Thomas Wolfe wrote that “You can’t go home again.” It’s true. Not because where you came from has changed. It is because you have changed.

Still, there will always be enough of Home that stays with you to keep you warm when life gets cold.

 

Books by Steve Liddick: https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=steve+liddick

Steve LiddickAuthor of “All That Time,” “Old Heroes,” “Prime Time Crime,” “Sky Warriors,” “But First This Message: A Quirky Journey in Broadcasting,” “A Family Restaurant is No Place for Children,” “Campsite Gourmet: Fine Dining on the Trail and on the Road,” and “Eat Cheap: A Cookbook and Guide To Stretching Your Food Budget Dollars.”

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THE AMERICAN DREAM

REFLECTIONS

by Steve Liddick

I don’t know how you define the American Dream, but my dream is to have a hundred-acre ranch far from what we jokingly refer to as “civilization.”

If we had that much land, I would draw a huge X on the property map. Where the lines intersect I would build my dream house.

We already have a small ranch. I used to call it a horse ranch, but we don’t have horses anymore, so we’re back to trying to justify calling it a ranch at all.

With a hundred acres we would be surrounded by a large amount of absolutely nothing. It would have to be fenced, of course. Without a fence, hunters tend to believe my property is their property during hunting season.

My wife says that’s too much property to maintain. I say the acre or so with the house and outbuildings is all that will need maintenance. The rest can just sit there and be a buffer zone.

Of course, we couldn’t shed all of what civilization offers. I have to have U.S. Postal and UPS delivery services. An Internet connection is a must and at least a couple of bars showing on my cell phone. At my advancing age, nearby health care would be handy. Also, I don’t want to have to drive too far for groceries or live beyond the point where my electrician, plumber, and appliance repair people would be willing to drive.

I know, I know. You’re saying you want to get away from it all without getting away from all of it.

Hey, it’s my American Dream and I’ll dream what I like.

 

Books by Steve Liddick: https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=steve+liddick

Steve LiddickAuthor of “All That Time,” “Old Heroes,” “Prime Time Crime,” “Sky Warriors,” “But First This Message: A Quirky Journey in Broadcasting,” “A Family Restaurant is No Place for Children,” “Campsite Gourmet: Fine Dining on the Trail and on the Road,” and “Eat Cheap: A Cookbook and Guide To Stretching Your Food Budget Dollars.”